Bible in 365 Days – Day 115

DAY 115.png

Focus Chapters:

  • 2 Samuel 8:15-18
  • 1 Chronicles 18:14-17
  • 1 Chronicles 6:16-30
  • 1 Chronicles 6:50-53
  • 1 Chronicles 6:31-48
  • 2 Samuel 9-10
  • 1 Chronicles 19

 

Standout Verse(s):

THE ACTION

1 Chronicles 19:1-2 NLT

Some time after this, King Nahash of the Ammonites died, and his son Hanun became king. David said, “I am going to show loyalty to Hanun because his father, Nahash, was always loyal to me.” So David sent messengers to express sympathy to Hanun about his father’s death.

 

THE REACTION

1 Chronicles 19:3-8 NLT

But when David’s ambassadors arrived in the land of Ammon, the Ammonite commanders said to Hanun, “Do you really think these men are coming here to honor your father? No! David has sent them to spy out the land so they can come in and conquer it!” So Hanun seized David’s ambassadors and shaved them, cut off their robes at the buttocks, and sent them back to David in shame.

When David heard what had happened to the men, he sent messengers to tell them, “Stay at Jericho until your beards grow out, and then come back.” For they felt deep shame because of their appearance.

When the people of Ammon realized how seriously they had angered David, Hanun and the Ammonites sent 75,000 pounds of silver to hire chariots and charioteers from Aram-naharaim, Aram-maacah, and Zobah. They also hired 32,000 chariots and secured the support of the king of Maacah and his army. These forces camped at Medeba, where they were joined by the Ammonite troops that Hanun had recruited from his own towns. When David heard about this, he sent Joab and all his warriors to fight them.

 

Observation (s):

  1. David’s intent was to show Hanun, the king of the Ammonites, sympathy following his father’s death and to continue good relations between the two nations.

    Some time after this, King Nahash of the Ammonites died, and his son Hanun became king. David said, “I am going to show loyalty to Hanun because his father, Nahash, was always loyal to me.” So David sent messengers to express sympathy to Hanun about his father’s death.

  2. The Ammonite commanders did not give David the benefit of doubt. They assumed that he had the worst intentions behind his actions and reacted accordingly.

    But when David’s ambassadors arrived in the land of Ammon, the Ammonite commanders said to Hanun, “Do you really think these men are coming here to honor your father? No! David has sent them to spy out the land so they can come in and conquer it!” So Hanun seized David’s ambassadors and shaved them, cut off their robes at the buttocks, and sent them back to David in shame.

  3. When the Ammonites recognized that their actions may have angered David, they escalated the situation by preparing for war. Only at this point does David react.

    When the people of Ammon realized how seriously they had angered David, Hanun and the Ammonites sent 75,000 pounds of silver to hire chariots and charioteers from Aram-naharaim, Aram-maacah, and Zobah. They also hired 32,000 chariots and secured the support of the king of Maacah and his army. These forces camped at Medeba, where they were joined by the Ammonite troops that Hanun had recruited from his own towns. When David heard about this, he sent Joab and all his warriors to fight them.

     

Application:

Misunderstanding or assuming you understand the intent behind people’s actions can trigger ill-will and a war. Effective communication occurs when a message is encoded, sent via a particular medium, decoded without losing its original intent and feedback sent. Two sets of communication took place between David and Hanun:

  1. David sent his sympathies via his messengers. Hanun and his commanders interpreted it to mean that David was insincere and spying on their nation. They retaliated by visually shaming David’s messengers and sending them back.
  2. Hanun, in recognizing the possible consequences of his actions, assumes that David is going to wage war on his nation and starts recruiting soldiers and allies and hiring war supplies. David, upon hearing of Hanun’s war preparation, sends out his army.

Each set of communication is ineffective because it is littered with assumptions, without any course of actions to trigger validation or clarification. Hanun, in both sets of communications assumes the worst of David, overlooking David’s prior relationship with his father. Hanun’s assumptions and his reactions, eventually triggers a war.

How are your communications? Are your reactions negative because, like Hanun, you assume the worst intent of the persons you communicate with? Try to get clarifications before reacting. This is your opportunity to forgo ill-will and possibly, an all-out unnecessary war.


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May the Peace of God go with you!

XOXO
Chañel

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I am a dynamic young lady who loves the Lord and seek to have a joy that no one can take away. My all-time favourite thing to do is gaining discoveries by design from My Father during our time each day. Reading, learning and trying new things falls behind in a close second place. My dream is to use my God-given talents to positively impact as many people as possible. As a proud Wolmerian, with a zest for life, I adhere to the “Age Quod Agis” motto in that whatsoever I do, I always do it to the best of my ability.

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