Bible in 365 Days – Day 9

Focus Chapters:

  • Genesis 25:27-34
  • Genesis 26-27
  • Genesis 28:1-5

 

Standout Verse(s):

THE ACTION

Genesis 26:1, 12-16 NLT

A severe famine now struck the land, as had happened before in Abraham’s time. So Isaac moved to Gerar, where Abimelech, king of the Philistines, lived.

When Isaac planted his crops that year, he harvested a hundred times more grain than he planted, for the Lord blessed him. He became a very rich man, and his wealth continued to grow. He acquired so many flocks of sheep and goats, herds of cattle, and servants that the Philistines became jealous of him. So the Philistines filled up all of Isaac’s wells with dirt. These were the wells that had been dug by the servants of his father, Abraham. Finally, Abimelech ordered Isaac to leave the country. “Go somewhere else,” he said, “for you have become too powerful for us.”

 

THE REACTION

Genesis 26:17-22, 26-28 NLT

So Isaac moved away to the Gerar Valley, where he set up their tents and settled down. He reopened the wells his father had dug, which the Philistines had filled in after Abraham’s death. Isaac also restored the names Abraham had given them. Isaac’s servants also dug in the Gerar Valley and discovered a well of fresh water. But then the shepherds from Gerar came and claimed the spring. “This is our water,” they said, and they argued over it with Isaac’s herdsmen. So Isaac named the well Esek (which means “argument”). Isaac’s men then dug another well, but again there was a dispute over it. So Isaac named it Sitnah (which means “hostility”). Abandoning that one, Isaac moved on and dug another well. This time there was no dispute over it, so Isaac named the place Rehoboth (which means “open space”), for he said, “At last the Lord has created enough space for us to prosper in this land.”

One day King Abimelech came from Gerar with his adviser, Ahuzzath, and also Phicol, his army commander. “Why have you come here?” Isaac asked. “You obviously hate me, since you kicked me off your land.” They replied, “We can plainly see that the Lord is with you. So we want to enter into a sworn treaty with you. Let’s make a covenant.

 

Observation (s):

  1. When the Lord blesses you, whatsoever you put your hand to will return a hundredfold, even during a bad season. During a famine, Issac planted and reaped a hundredfold in that same year.

    A severe famine now struck the land, as had happened before in Abraham’s time. So Isaac moved to Gerar, where Abimelech, king of the Philistines, lived.When Isaac planted his crops that year, he harvested a hundred times more grain than he planted, for the Lord blessed him.

  2. When God blesses you, you are bound to gain some enemies. As Issac’s wealth grew due God’s blessings, people begun to envy and fear him. Envy caused the Philistines attempts at blocking his progress by filling his wells with dirt. Due to fear, Abimelek sends him away. Though he has done nothing wrong, Issac leaves at Abimelek’s request.

    He acquired so many flocks of sheep and goats, herds of cattle, and servants that the Philistines became jealous of him. So the Philistines filled up all of Isaac’s wells with dirt. Finally, Abimelech ordered Isaac to leave the country. “Go somewhere else,” he said, “for you have become too powerful for us.” So Isaac moved away to the Gerar Valley, where he set up their tents and settled down.

  3. God turns Issac’s departure from Gerar into a positive situation. Issac goes on to discover three new wells, in addition to opening his father’s old wells. While two of those new wells cause contention with his enemies, God eventually makes room at Rehoboth. Even his enemies ends up acknowledging that God is with him and comes to make peace.

    He reopened the wells his father had dug, which the Philistines had filled in after Abraham’s death.

    Isaac’s servants also dug in the Gerar Valley and discovered a well of fresh water. But then the shepherds from Gerar came and claimed the spring. “This is our water,” they said, and they argued over it with Isaac’s herdsmen. So Isaac named the well Esek (which means “argument”). Isaac’s men then dug another well, but again there was a dispute over it. So Isaac named it Sitnah (which means “hostility”). Abandoning that one, Isaac moved on and dug another well. This time there was no dispute over it, so Isaac named the place Rehoboth (which means “open space”), for he said, “At last the Lord has created enough space for us to prosper in this land.

    They replied, “We can plainly see that the Lord is with you. So we want to enter into a sworn treaty with you. Let’s make a covenant.

 

Application:

When you are led by God, he will open doors for you and bless you a hundredfold, despite what the world recognizes as a dry season.

It is important to understand that you don’t have to do anything negative to gain enemies. All Issac did was prosper according to the blessings God rendered unto him and yet still he was envied and feared. I must say that I loved the way Issac responds to his enemies. He chooses to leave the zones of contention. Look what happens! Without Issac lifting a finger, Abimelek is drawn back to him, not just to apologise and seek peace but to also acknowledge that God is with Issac. This shows that when God is with us, we don’t need to do anything but hold our peace and watch for the results of God fighting our battles in the spiritual realm.

God’s provision gives fresh meaning to the phrase “He prepares a table before me in the presence of mine enemies.” Can you imagine that? Every time the shepherds caused trouble about a new well that is discovered, God guides Issac’s men to another one! When God’s directions are followed, He makes room in front of your enemies. When God is your champion defender and provider, you have no need to worry! He makes room!

 

XOXO,
Chañel

Bible Godly Lessons

DiscoveringByDesign View All →

I am a dynamic young lady who loves the Lord and seek to have a joy that no one can take away. My all-time favourite thing to do is gaining discoveries by design from My Father during our time each day. Reading, learning and trying new things falls behind in a close second place. My dream is to use my God-given talents to positively impact as many people as possible. As a proud Wolmerian, with a zest for life, I adhere to the “Age Quod Agis” motto in that whatsoever I do, I always do it to the best of my ability.

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